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    Montana / RV as a lifeboat

    Hurricanes Harvey and Irma both caused conversation between Tina and I and among some friends. Those of us with an RV of "size" have the ability to carry some of the more important things from home and "Bug Out". Florida is a bit of a different animal as many have come to realize. If you live in the southern portion of the state and a hurricane like Irma comes along, for-casted to run stem to stern, you have a long road to travel to get north before you could head east, west, or continue north.

    The thought of that still sickens me as with the massive flow of traffic headed north everything along the highway, as far as services are concerned, are going to be consumed. You could find yourself on the side of the road, worse off than if you were in your home riding the storm out. Lets leave the uniqueness of Florida out of this question for the moment.

    In the North East, we seldom get hurricanes. It has been a while since we had one of some force. Usually these are glancing blows. However they can dump significant rain and have substantial winds with them. I have a 12.5K Wat generator that powers about 90% of the house and can run for about 8 hours. We had an ice storm several years ago that did significant damage. Many power lines in the North East are above ground, outside of cities. Those lines are subject to falling limbs and trees. After about 1/2" of ice has accumulated, all bets are off and stuff starts coming down. To make matters worse until recently there was only a very few gas stations in my area that had a back up generator. No power, No gas... No power, No gas, No generator..... No Power, No Gas, No Generator, No heat. That is not good in sub-freezing temperatures. House pipes can be drained and things protected to reduce or eliminate damage. But what about us, pets, family?

    When winterizing the Fifth Wheel, I do so with 2 full propane tanks. If we lose everything else, we have a warm fifth wheel for a few days and more time to deal with gasoline for the generator. It has come in handy a few times. Additionally during the "On Season" our Montana is fully stocked short of perishables. Indeed, I could go home this instant, hook up and pull away and I would be all set with the contents of the cupboards for 3 or 4 days.


    BUT I have never been challenged by a natural disaster in which we would feel compelled to hitch up and leave the area. I would like to think I could do it with relatively little effort. But maybe I am being naive.


    So what about you?
    What about your area?
    Is using your RV as a lifeboat a possibility?
    Could you do it?
    How would you prepare?

    Eric
    Fifth Wheel: 2015 Montana 3750FL Tow Vehicle: 2013 Ford F350 6.7L Lariat, Crew Cab. Eric and Tina

    #2
    That's why we stay put. For several reasons. We live in central FL. no storm surge. Storms generally not as potent. Traveling out of state, unless done ahead of time could put you in a worse off situation then if you stayed. Your going to sit in traffic and when its time for fuel, you may not get any cause everyone else will need it too. Places will be booked. We watched the traffic cams and saw it was best to stay put.

    You cannot predict where the storm is going. Some friends have asked us to come to there place, which was great, but as we have seen the storm covered them too. I feel you will be much better off if you are properly prepared to wait it out. Cordless tools for cutting your self out of a damage section in a home. A flash light that blinks SOS. etc.

    We were lucky that we have our rv on our property. We moved it along side on the garage and filled it with fresh water and propane. This would be our second choice to stay if the house was breached. We also have a small apartment attached to our garage which would be our third choice. Neighbors and shelters our forth choice.
    Scott L.
    2012 Ram 3500 Dually LongHorn
    2014 3402RL Legacy Edition

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      #3
      Everybody's decision to stay or leave is going to be different for different reasons. We have 50+ 100' trees in our yard and when one falls it will kill you or your house. (my next house will have only shrubs) I prepped the RV for this storm because it was going to be coming this way, but turned in the end. If I stayed I'd have a demand of 36KW of electricity and a 2KW generator. We have too many things that need to be powered. I will leave and come back when there is power. If the fridges all have to be replace because of rotting food, so be it.

      I was surprised to see that people left RVs on the Keys. All I saw were turned over.
      Jim Abernathy
      Holly Springs, NC
      2014 Ram 3500 LaramieĀ® 4x2 diesel dually crew-cab 3.73 axle, Reese R20
      2014 Montana 3402RL, Level UP, G614's, TST 507, Voyger Wireless Backup camera

      [IMG2=JSON]{"data-align":"none","data-size":"medium","title":"3402-avatar.jpg","src":"https:\/\/montanarovers.vbulletin.net\/filedata\/fetch?filedataid=179&type=medium"}[/IMG2]

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        #4
        We have used ours after an ice storm. The ice storm pretty much tore down lines everywhere. It was7-8 days before we got power back.

        however, there was no way to leave the area. There would have to be special circumstances, I guess, to actually cause us to hitch up and go. A hurricane is one. We have many routes available to us, if leaving was necessary.
        Fifth Wheel: 2015 Montana 3750FL Tow Vehicle: 2013 Ford F350 6.7L Lariat, Crew Cab. Eric and Tina

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          #5
          Hope everyone is safe!
          Scott L.
          2012 Ram 3500 Dually LongHorn
          2014 3402RL Legacy Edition

          Comment


            #6
            I think that having the ability to get out of dadge to some where more safe with the knowledge that you won't be just getting by, but will be comfortable too is a comforting thing.
            Fifth Wheel: 2015 Montana 3750FL Tow Vehicle: 2013 Ford F350 6.7L Lariat, Crew Cab. Eric and Tina

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