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Here is something that may help folks that have a problem understanding electricity.

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  • Here is something that may help folks that have a problem understanding electricity.


    Here is something that may help folks that have a problem understanding electricity.

    https://www.rvtechmag.com/electrical/chapter3.php


    "50 Amp RV Service:

    To facilitate the larger loads placed upon the newer RVs the 50 amp service was brought out. Whereas the 30 amp service was a 120 volt service yielding 3,600 watts of power, the 50 amp service is a 120/240 split phase service. The split phase service means you have two 120 volt 50 amp poles, which gives you a total of up to 12,000 watts. So the perceived increase from 30 to 50 doesn't sound like very much but the real increase from 3,600 to 12,000 puts it into a more realistic perspective. Keep in mind that this assumes that you can utilize both of the two 50 amp poles effectively by balancing your load. If all of your loads are on one side of the panel you'll only be using one 50 amp pole, which means that you can only get 6,000 watts. So, it is important to split your loads and balance them between both phases on the breaker panel in order to get maximum capacity."


    Phil P

    PS: the only thing I wrote is the title.
    Phil P
    2009 Montana 3665RE
    2009 Silverado Durtamax DW Quad Cab Long bed
    as of 10/20/2016 have 90,000 miles on the Montana and 172,000 on the Silverado

  • #2
    Originally posted by Phil P View Post
    Here is something that may help folks that have a problem understanding electricity.

    https://www.rvtechmag.com/electrical/chapter3.php


    "50 Amp RV Service:

    To facilitate the larger loads placed upon the newer RVs the 50 amp service was brought out. Whereas the 30 amp service was a 120 volt service yielding 3,600 watts of power, the 50 amp service is a 120/240 split phase service. The split phase service means you have two 120 volt 50 amp poles, which gives you a total of up to 12,000 watts. So the perceived increase from 30 to 50 doesn't sound like very much but the real increase from 3,600 to 12,000 puts it into a more realistic perspective. Keep in mind that this assumes that you can utilize both of the two 50 amp poles effectively by balancing your load. If all of your loads are on one side of the panel you'll only be using one 50 amp pole, which means that you can only get 6,000 watts. So, it is important to split your loads and balance them between both phases on the breaker panel in order to get maximum capacity."


    Phil P

    PS: the only thing I wrote is the title.
    Thanks, Phil. I will admit that I have limited electrical knowledge and posts like yours are helpful.
    Don Lee
    Full timing with a Madison, SD domicile.

    2012 Ford F350 Lariat - DRW 6.7L Diesel
    2016 Montana Legacy 3720RL with 8 - 150w solar panels, charging three lithium ion smart batteries, 2800w inverter.

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    • #3
      As an additional note. One needs to be aware that 30 amp RV pedestal wiring circuits are different than home wiring of a 30 amp circuit such as to the clothes dryer when using 3 wire. If someone wants to add a 30 amp receptacle outside to their RV, and uses their home wiring diagram for 30 amps there are going to be big problems. They are wired totally different. But, no need to muddy the water with an explanation of all that.

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      • #4
        Thanks for the excellent explanation!

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by snowbirds R us View Post
          As an additional note. One needs to be aware that 30 amp RV pedestal wiring circuits are different than home wiring of a 30 amp circuit such as to the clothes dryer when using 3 wire. If someone wants to add a 30 amp receptacle outside to their RV, and uses their home wiring diagram for 30 amps there are going to be big problems. They are wired totally different. But, no need to muddy the water with an explanation of all that.

          The difference between a range plug 220 / 240 volt with no ground or a full phase 220 / 240 electrical circuit is the receptacle. The rand plug receptacle looks like a 30 amp RV receptacle but you have to bend some of the prongs on a 30 amp RV plug to get it in a range receptacle. Don’t do this if you have a range receptacle in your garage that you would like to use.

          On top of that having an electrician install a RV receptacle doesn’t always guarantee that the voltage will be correct. I had the electricians that did the repairs after the Hurricanes of 2005 in Florida put a 30 amp RV receptacle in my aircraft hanger and they did wire it like a range plug.

          So the recommendation I have is if you add a service for your RV make sure and do the checks described on that web site before plugging anything into it.

          Phil P

          Phil P
          2009 Montana 3665RE
          2009 Silverado Durtamax DW Quad Cab Long bed
          as of 10/20/2016 have 90,000 miles on the Montana and 172,000 on the Silverado

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Phil P View Post


            The difference between a range plug 220 / 240 volt with no ground or a full phase 220 / 240 electrical circuit is the receptacle. The rand plug receptacle looks like a 30 amp RV receptacle but you have to bend some of the prongs on a 30 amp RV plug to get it in a range receptacle. Don’t do this if you have a range receptacle in your garage that you would like to use.

            On top of that having an electrician install a RV receptacle doesn’t always guarantee that the voltage will be correct. I had the electricians that did the repairs after the Hurricanes of 2005 in Florida put a 30 amp RV receptacle in my aircraft hanger and they did wire it like a range plug.

            So the recommendation I have is if you add a service for your RV make sure and do the checks described on that web site before plugging anything into it.

            Phil P
            Now ya did it Phil, ya muddied the water. lol. This is something to really be aware of, and Phil is right, some electricians are not familiar with RV wiring and made that wiring mistake enough that some are just getting the word.

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